Somber Tributes Mark 9/11 Anniversary

Tradition of reading names of those killed continues on 12th anniversary of terror attacks

 


 

JENNIFER PELTZ, Associated Press | Wednesday, September 11, 2013

GALLERIES

Multimedia Thumb

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Americans solemnly mark the anniversary of the terror attacks.
More >



VIDEO

Multimedia Thumb

9/11 Anniversary Marked With Somber Tributes

Relatives read aloud the names of victims killed in terror attack.
more >


Multimedia Thumb

PAPD Tribute 9/11/01

Remembering those killed on September 11, 2001.
more >


Multimedia Thumb

The NYPD 23

Remembering those killed on September 11, 2001.
more >




NEW YORK (AP) — As bells tolled solemnly, Americans marked the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on Wednesday with the reading of the names, moments of silence and serene music that have become tradition.

At a morning ceremony on the 2-year-old memorial plaza at the site of the World Trade Center, relatives recited the names of the nearly 3,000 people who died when hijacked jets crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and near Shanksville, Pa., as well as the 1993 trade center bombing victims' names.

In Washington, President Barak Obama, joined by first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and wife Jill Biden and members of the White House staff, walked out to the South Lawn at 8:46 a.m. — the moment the first plane struck the south tower in New York. At the site in lower Manhattan, friends and families silently held up photos of the deceased. Others wept.

"Daddy, I miss you so much, and I think about you every day," Christina Aceto said of her father, Richard Anthony Aceto. "You were more than just my daddy, you were my best friend."

Bells tolled to mark the second plane hitting the second tower, and the airliner that crashed into the Pentagon. Near the memorial plaza, police barricades were blocking access to the site, even as life around the World Trade Center looked like any other morning, with workers rushing to their jobs and construction cranes looming over the area.

"As time passes and our family grows, our children remind us of you," Angilic Casalduc said of her mother, Vivian Casalduc. "We miss you."

Name-reading, wreath-laying and other tributes also will be held at the Pentagon and at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville while the commemoration unfolds at ground zero, where the mayor who has helped orchestrate the observances from their start watched for his last time in office. And saying nothing.

"No matter how many years pass, this time comes around each year — and it's always the same," said Karen Hinson of Seaford, N.Y., who lost her 34-year-old brother, Michael Wittenstein, a Cantor Fitzgerald employee.

"My brother was never found, so this is where he is for us," she said as she arrived for the ceremony with her family early Wednesday.

Loved ones milled around the memorial site, making rubbings of names, putting flowers by the names of victims and weeping, arm-in-arm. Former Gov. George Pataki, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and others were in attendance. Continuing a decision made last year, no politicians will speak, including Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Over his years as mayor and chairman of the National Sept. 11 Memorial & Museum, Bloomberg has sometimes tangled with victims' relatives, religious leaders and other elected officials over an event steeped in symbolism and emotion. But his administration has largely succeeded at its goal of keeping the commemoration centered on the attacks' victims and their families and relatively free of political image-making.

"Joe, we honor you today and all those lost on Sept. 11," said Kathleen O'Shea, whose nephew Joseph Gullickson was a firefighter in Brooklyn. "Everyone sends their love and asks that you continue to watch over us all, especially your wife."

Memorial organizers expect to take primary responsibility for the ceremony next year and say they plan to continue concentrating the event on victims' loved ones, even as the forthcoming museum creates a new, broader framework for remembering 9/11.

"As things evolve in the future, the focus on the remembrance is going to stay sacrosanct," memorial President Joe Daniels said.

Hinson said she would like the annual ceremony to be "more low-key, more private" as the years go by.

The 12th anniversary also arrives with changes coming at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, where officials gathered Tuesday to herald the start of construction on a visitor center. At the Pentagon, plans call for a morning ceremony for victims' relatives and survivors of the attacks and an afternoon observance for Pentagon workers.

Around the world, thousands of volunteers have pledged to do good deeds, honoring an anniversary that was designated a National Day of Service and Remembrance in 2009.

When Bloomberg and then-Gov. George Pataki announced the plans for the first anniversary in 2002, the mayor said the "intent is to have a day of observances that are simple and powerful."

His role hasn't always been comfortable. When the ceremony was shifted to nearby Zuccotti Park in 2007 because of rebuilding at the trade center site, some victims' relatives threatened to boycott the occasion. The lead-up to the 10th anniversary brought pressure to invite more political figures and to include clergy in the ceremony.

By next year's anniversary, Bloomberg will be out of office, and the museum is expected to be open beneath the memorial plaza.

While the memorial honors those killed, the museum is intended to present a broader picture of 9/11, including the experiences of survivors and first responders.

But the organizers expect they "will always keep the focus on the families on the anniversary," Daniels said. That focus was clear as relatives gathered last September on the tree-laden plaza, where a smaller crowd was gathering Wednesday — only friends and family of the victims were allowed.

Bruni Sandolval carried a large photo of childhood friend Nereida DeJesus, a victim.

"We grew up together on the Lower East Side and I come every year with her family," she said. "Coming here is peaceful in a way."

Denise Matuza, who lost her husband on Sept. 11, said people ask her why she still comes to the service with her three sons.

"It doesn't make us feel good to stay home," she said. Her husband called after the towers were struck. "He said a plane hit the building, they were finding their way out, he'd be home in a little while. I just waited and waited," she said.

"A few days later I found an email he had sent that they couldn't get out."

___

Associated Press writers Verena Dobnik and Jim Fitzgerald in New York and Nedra Pickler in Washington contributed to this report.

___

Follow Jennifer Peltz at http://twitter.com/jennpeltz

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Mobile Category: 
News


Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, right, hugs a friend at the 9/11 Memorial during ceremonies marking the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Stan Honda, Pool)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

The World Trade Center Flag is presented as friends and relatives of the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks gather at the National September 11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, for a ceremony marking the 12th anniversary of the attacks in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Friends and relatives of the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks gather at the National September 11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, for a ceremony marking the 12th anniversary of the attacks in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Daniel Henry, a Port Authority of New York/New Jersey police officer, pauses during a moment of silence at 9:01 a.m. at the south reflecting pool at the 9/11 Memorial on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, during ceremonies marking the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York. (AP Photo/Stan Honda, Pool)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Retired FDNY Marshal, Ernie Medaglia, of Bronxville, N.Y., who was at the attacks at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, is emotional as he listens to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a ceremony near the 9/11 Memorial honoring first responders and FDNY Rescue 1 on the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Singer Billy Joel, left, and motorcycle designer and television personality Paul Teutul, Jr., look up at One World Trade Center Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, after they rode with firefighters and first responders with the FDNY Motorcycle Club from FDNY Rescue 1 headquarters to the World Trade Center site for the 12th anniversary commemorations of the 9/11 attacks. The ride represented the firefighters who responded on 9/11. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

FDNY Firefighter Mike Bellantoni of New York prepares a memento at the Firefighter's Memorial adjacent to the World Trade Center Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013 before the start of the official ceremonies at the 9/11 Memorial nearby. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo rides with firefighters and first responders with the FDNY Motorcycle Club Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, from FDNY Rescue 1 headquarters to the World Trade Center site for the 12th anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks. The ride represented the firefighters who responded to the attacks on that day. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is ringed by skyscrapers, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013 in New York. Ceremonies will be held Wednesday at the memorial to mark the 12th anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and Jill Biden stand for a moment of silence on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, as they mark the 12th anniversary of the September 11 terror attacks. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

A woman touches the stone with names of the 9/11 victims at the 9/11 Memorial during ceremonies marking the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Chris Pedota, Pool)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Ron Joy makes a rubbing of his friend's name, New York Fire Department firefighter Capt. Vincent Giammona, at the South reflecting pool at the 9/11 Memorial on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, during ceremonies marking the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York. (AP Photo/Stan Honda, Pool)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Mija Quigley, of Princeton Junction, N.J., embraces the name of her son, Patrick Quigley, during ceremonies marking the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. Patrick Quigley died aboard Flight 175 when it crashed into the South Tower on 9/11. (AP Photo/Chris Pedota, Pool)


Gallery 1

12th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

Jeana Fossali, a close family member of Police Officer John William Perry, traces his name engraved in the South Pool at the 9/11 Memorial during a ceremony marking the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, Pool)




9/11 Anniversary Marked With Somber Tributes



PAPD Tribute 9/11/01



The NYPD 23


Connect: Have a thought or feedback about this? Add your comment now
print share
 
What's Your Take? Comment Now ...

 

 

Get LawOfficer in Your Inbox

Terms of Service Privacy Policy